Welcome to the Alzheimer's Disease Community!

  • photo Melissa Price Williams
    Daughter, Former Caregiver

    Follow your instincts, follow your heart. If something doesn't feel right, speak up, ask questions, don't be afraid of second opinions, and remember this disease is a marathon.

  • photo Steve Waterhouse
    Husband, Caregiver

    If I can't control the disease, and there are no drugs for it, what can I control? Well, I can control what we do today.

  • photo Lauren Dykovitz
    Daughter, Caregiver

    I was only 28 when I started taking care of my mom, so it felt like no one understood what I was going through because I was pretty young for a caregiver.

  • photo Steve Waterhouse
    Husband, Caregiver

    If I can't control the disease, and there are no drugs for it, what can I control? Well, I can control what we do today.

  • photo Kathleen Heery, RN
    Expert

    For families dealing with Alzheimer's, life becomes a blur of receding memories and revolving losses. This can leave families and loved ones wondering what to do, how long a loved one will remain functional and the big question: "how long do we have?"

  • photo Rachael Simonton, RN
    Expert

    For those of you who are caregivers reading this, thank you for all you do. You are so valuable to your family. Your loved one may not be able to remember this gift of your time and energy but it has a lasting impact.

  • photo Mark Beaumont, MD
    Expert

    Keeping your brain active by solving puzzles like crosswords, Sudoku, or cryptograms can help to improve brain function and delay the onset of Alzheimers.

  • photo Rachael Simonton, RN
    Expert

    For those of you who are caregivers reading this, thank you for all you do. You are so valuable to your family. Your loved one may not be able to remember this gift of your time and energy but it has a lasting impact.

The most common form of dementia, Alzheimer's Disease happens when brain cells and the connections between them weaken over time. These weakened connections are thought to result from the irregular build-up of two proteins in the brain called beta-amyloid plaques and tau tangles.
Though there is a lot of variation in the different types of dementia, people with Alzheimer's often suffer from memory loss and depression in early stages of the disease. As the disease progresses, people begin to lose social and motor skills.
Alzheimer's disease is generally diagnosed in people over 65 years old, and is more common in individuals with a family history of the disease or with another pre-existing condition (such as Type 2 Diabetes or cardiovascular disease).

Learn About Living With Alzheimer's

Early Stages: Trouble remembering, Trouble carrying out day-to-day duties, Nervousness, Difficulty controlling emotions.

Middle Stages: Worsening of early symptoms, trouble communicating (writing, talking), loss of control over actions or mood, decreased ability to focus.

Last Stages: Increased trouble expressing oneself, difficulty keeping a steady weight, exhaustion, seizures, trouble eating.

Use our clinician-created tool below to see what stage of Alzheimer's Disease you or your loved one is at.

Learn What Stage of Alzheimer's You Or Your loved is at!

Several treatments exist that help improve symptoms of Alzheimer's Disease. A permanent cure has not been found, but clinical research is ongoing.
There are five medications available that strengthen communication between brain cells. Exercise and intellectually engaging activities (such as listening to music and solving puzzles) have also been found to lessen symptoms in several studies.
More research is being conducted on lifestyle-based treatments. For example, at last year's Alzheimer's Association International Conference (AAIC), blood pressure drugs were shown to significantly lower the risk for mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a pre-diagnostic state experienced before AD.

Search, Explore, and Compare Alzheimer's Treatments
Clinical research is central to improving the care and outcomes of people with Alzheimer's Disease, getting closer to a successful treatment, and to preventing or lowering the risk of Alzheimer's for future generations. Although not every trial is successful, each study gives scientists future research directions.
From understanding the genes behind Alzheimer's, to working towards prevention, clinical research is not possible without patient participation -- researchers, clinicians, and families must work together to create the next breakthrough.
Read the Latest Research & Breakthroughs in Alzheimer's

Quick Facts about Alzheimer's Disease

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